Search

Presuming Competence in Your Child: Four Tips for Parents to Share with Providers

When I met three-year-old “Tim”, he had such difficulty with spoken language and controlling his body that it was difficult to tell how much he could comprehend of the world around him. He couldn’t show his understanding with words—or even with movements. A decade later, he has learned to type on an iPad and uses […]

Read Full Article

Different, Not Deficient: Five Ways to Ensure your Special Child is Receiving the Right Messages

I’m grateful for the wonderful response to my last post, Ten Things to Ask of Professionals working with your Special Needs Child, which focused on helping the adults in your child’s life to see the positive, not just the deficits. In the coming weeks, I’ll focus on each point individually, elaborating more specifically on how […]

Read Full Article

Ten Things to Ask of Professionals Working with Your Special Needs Child

A Fresno, California mother made headlines when she sued her daughter’s teacher and school administrators. The mom had paid a surprise classroom visit and allegedly found her developmentally delayed seven-year-old locked in a makeshift cage and wearing a soiled diaper. The principal of the school reportedly told police that the enclosure was a safety precaution that had […]

Read Full Article

What Every Professional Needs to Know about Parent Stress and Autism

Last week London McCabe, an autistic six-year old, died a senseless, tragic and preventable death at the hands of his mother.  As professionals, there are steps we can take to prevent additional casualties of innocent lives.  The first thing we can do is to examine our own beliefs and make sure we are not communicating […]

Read Full Article

Why Spanking is an Ineffective form of Discipline

The ongoing debate about spanking heated up again this week, as this topic continues to capture the interest of the media and parents.  I do not judge the intentions of parents who feel that spanking is an appropriate form of punishment.  Fundamentally, parents love and want to protect their children, and prepare them for living […]

Read Full Article

Take Charge, Take Action on your Infant’s Development

A new study released today by researchers at the Mind Institute and published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders found that early and intensive supportive interaction by parents (not therapists) diminished or took away signs of delay in almost all the children in the study.  Even though the sample size was very small, […]

Read Full Article

The Role of Parents in Developmental Treatment

The intuitive wisdom that parents are essential partners in their child’s growth and development has not always found a place in medical model therapeutic approaches. But in research circles today, when scientists talk about “critical ingredients” or crucial aspects of a treatment that make a difference toward a cure, the parent-child relationship is getting unprecedented […]

Read Full Article

Where Parents are the Experts and Professionals are the Learners

An inspiring blog post by a mom and advocate of the Awenesty of Autism site described a dramatic office visit and the choice she made to not put a limit on her child’s future: In the author’s post, she writes: “After the evaluation, the lovely doctor, in a very nice, professional manner basically told me […]

Read Full Article

Are Therapies Respectful of Autism?

One of the most powerful position statements in the Autism Self Advocacy Network (ASAN), a national group run by persons on the spectrum regarding health care and the respectful use of therapies is as follows: “Many therapies and products for Autistic children and adults are helpful and should be made more widely available, such as […]

Read Full Article

TOPICS

Mona’s Facebook

Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.21 hours ago
This new post explains why we can do away with the blame- game in helping children with behavioral challenges. #challengingbehaviors #mentalhealth #beyondbehaviors #polyvagaltheory #ODD #Positiveparenting #specialeducation #childwelfare #ACES #conductdisorders Psychotherapy Networker
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.22 hours ago
Powerful tip from Tina Payne Bryson & our local treasure, The Center for Connection. When you move your body into different positions, you activate emotions, thoughts, and feelings associated with that posture. Add playfulness while doing this! Ask your kids to show you what their bodies look like when they feel brave — have them actually strike a physical pose. Standing brave helps us feel brave or take 2-3 minutes to assume a floppy noodle posture, or an octopus, or any other posture that is super floppy and relaxed. Hold it for a couple of minutes.
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.1 week ago
Do you know the difference between top- down and bottom- up behaviors? If you’re a parent, teacher, provider (or know a child) understanding the difference is so important. #parenting #socialemotionallearning #childwelfare #ACES #Beyondbehaviors #Education #Specialeducation #Fostering #Positiveparenting #Traumainformed
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.1 week ago
... girls’ confidence drops 30 percent between ages eight and 14. The good news is that 80 percent of those girls say they want to feel more confident, and parents can help". Great advice for raising resilient daughters from Phyllis Steinberg Fagell.