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Self-Reg: Busting the Myth of Self-Control

A new book, Self-Reg, explodes the myth that if only children tried harder or had enough willpower, they could control all of their challenging behaviors. The reality is much more complicated than that.

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Relationships in Special Education: We Must Do Better

Far too often, children with special educational needs experience disruptions in relationships, including frequent changes in aides, teachers and school placements, causing stress.

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A Mother’s Day Gift for Ourselves

A recent parenting study shed light on something so simple yet so profound that it may be one of the best gifts you can give yourself and your child.

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The Critical Ingredient that Should Be Part of Every IEP

My wish for families during this IEP season is that emotional regulation, supported by engaged relationships, finds its way into every discussion about a child. A child’s ability to feel safe and engaged provides a solid foundation for all areas of learning and socialization.

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Early Autism Intervention: Yes, You Do Have Options

Since professionals and educators may not apprise you of the many early autism intervention choices available, it’s essential to do your own research and pursue the approach that feels most suitable for your child and family.

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Early Intervention: Taking a Mindful Approach

Early intervention should not be a race against developmental delays, but rather a thoughtful path to nurture each child’s own potential to develop at his or her own pace. A fast pace that emphasizes doing rather than being with a child can interfere with what children need most: an engaged and relaxed parent.

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Ain’t Misbehavin: Understanding Challenging Behaviors from the Inside Out

Challenging behaviors are not always intentional misbehavior. We have to understand the meaning behind them in order to best support each child.

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A Missing Ingredient in Autism Therapies

The emotional life of the child is often not considered in the behavioral treatment of autism. This article offers suggestions to enhance the child's emotional development in autism treatment.

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When Your Child’s Tantrums Make you Tantrum

What a tantruming child needs is an adult who can first help them find calmness in the body, and then later offer teaching moments. Toddlers—all human beings, really—cannot take in new information when they are in an active tantrum state.

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Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.21 hours ago
School's starting here, and it's a perfect time to think about those behavior charts, clip charts, and "change your color" charts. Thanks Dr. Emily W. King, Child and Adolescent Psychology for giving us food for thought! #Education #specialeducation #Beyondbehaviors #SEL #Socialemotional #childstress #childbehaviors Parents
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.2 days ago
If you parent or work with children with behavioral challenges or autism spectrum, this interview on NPR show Lifestyles shows how we can better support classrooms and our communities. Hope you can listen and comment! #behaviors #Specialeducation #Autism #neurodiversity #education #traumainformed #childwelfare #Beyondbehaviors #IEP #specialneeds #ODD
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.5 days ago
This new post explains why we can do away with the blame- game in helping children with behavioral challenges. #challengingbehaviors #mentalhealth #beyondbehaviors #polyvagaltheory #ODD #Positiveparenting #specialeducation #childwelfare #ACES #conductdisorders Psychotherapy Networker
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.5 days ago
Powerful tip from Tina Payne Bryson & our local treasure, The Center for Connection. When you move your body into different positions, you activate emotions, thoughts, and feelings associated with that posture. Add playfulness while doing this! Ask your kids to show you what their bodies look like when they feel brave — have them actually strike a physical pose. Standing brave helps us feel brave or take 2-3 minutes to assume a floppy noodle posture, or an octopus, or any other posture that is super floppy and relaxed. Hold it for a couple of minutes.
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.
Mona Delahooke, Ph.D.2 weeks ago
Do you know the difference between top- down and bottom- up behaviors? If you’re a parent, teacher, provider (or know a child) understanding the difference is so important. #parenting #socialemotionallearning #childwelfare #ACES #Beyondbehaviors #Education #Specialeducation #Fostering #Positiveparenting #Traumainformed